What Indiana's New Background Check Law Means for Healthcare Employers

A new law has expanded the requirements for criminal history checks on employees and owners of home health care and personal services facilities in Indiana. As of July 1, 2016, employers must complete an expanded or national criminal history check on all new hires, and no employee without the check can serve patients in their residences. Owners are also subject to the criminal history check requirement and conviction for specific offenses prohibits anyone from owning a facility or providing services to a patient in his or her home.

How to Close the Background Check Loopholes for Nurses and Physicians

Most healthcare employers rely on a rigorous background check program in order to safeguard their patients and staff. Background screening is an important part of the hiring and employment qualification process, especially in a safety-sensitive industry such as healthcare. Unfortunately, there are a few background check loopholes in healthcare, particularly for nurses and physicians, which makes having a strong background screening program much more important.

Student Background Checks: Understanding the Different Types of Criminal Searches

Most health sciences colleges and allied health clinical education programs utilize background checks for screening students, but selecting the right type of background check is just as important. For institutions and clinical program coordinators, selecting a background check that meets the requirements of the clinical sites where students will complete their clinical rotations is key. The most important thing to remember is that background checks come in different flavors, so it’s important to understand the difference between the various types of criminal searches that are available.

Indiana Calls for Strengthening Teacher Background Checks

Background check practices in schools have received a fair amount of attention in the last few years. Indiana, for example, is among the 12 states and the District of Columbia to recently receive an F for the screening of their teachers, according to an investigation by USA Today with IndyStar.

3 Background Check Compliance Best Practices for 2016

Employers and human resources leaders have seen several changes to their background check process and policies in the last few years. Today, the increasing number of class-action lawsuits and ever-present threat of data breaches have prompted employers to review their current screening practices and apply proper safeguards to protect patients and their sensitive healthcare information.

6 Misconceptions About the FBI Fingerprint Background Check

In theory, it would make logical sense that a background check based on biometrics such as fingerprints would result in a highly accurate investigation. Background screening experts agree, however, that the FBI fingerprint background check should never be considered a “gold standard” in employment screening. If your healthcare organization currently conducts fingerprint background checks, you’re likely doing so because of a legal requirement. But there’s quite a bit of confusion around and strong misconceptions about the quality of fingerprint based checks.

Staying Ahead of Doctor Background Check Loopholes

Criminal background checks can be an effective risk mitigation tool for healthcare organizations and medical staff departments in vetting the quality of physicians. Unfortunately, not all states require background checks for doctors, which can pose a safety risk for patients.

The OIG’s Interim Report on the National Background Check Program for Long-Term-Care Employees

This January, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) released an Interim Report on the National Background Check Program for Long-Term-Care Employees. According to the OIG, ensuring that long-term-care employees in nursing facilities, home health agencies, and hospices have undergone a minimum level of screening helps protect the safety of patients in these settings.

OIG Work Plan 2016: 3 Things Healthcare Organizations Can Expect

In case you may have missed it, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) published its latest Work Plan for fiscal year 2016 last week. Each year, healthcare organizations should review their compliance programs to ensure they address the regulatory agency’s latest areas of focus.

5 Key Changes Affecting Medical Staff Services in 2016 and Beyond

Medical services professionals are often seen as the “gateway” to healthcare organizations. They are key to ensuring the healthcare professionals hired and given privileges to serve organizations’ patients are fully qualified They also ensure the organization remains compliant with state and national regulations on qualifications and credentials. It’s an important role, and that won’t change as 2016 approaches, but some things will.

Here are four changes MSPs can expect to see in 2016 and beyond.

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