Medical history is fraught with racial disparities in healthcare, and the problem persists today. Pregnancy-related mortality rates for black women in the U.S.

The Future of Healthcare Human Resources After COVID-19

The coronavirus pandemic sent seismic shifts through the healthcare industry, forcing organizations and workforces to evolve at a breathtaking speed. For the first time, the American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) annual conference was held virtually this past August. While many healthcare systems were gearing up for change before COVID-19 hit, the pandemic exponentially accelerated the pace of change.

COVID-19 continues to spread across the U.S. and it’s having a huge impact on the healthcare industry. Optimizing patient outcomes and saving lives on the frontlines of COVID-care rely on skilled and resilient staff with diverse backgrounds and experiences. Healthcare HR teams and leaders face enormous challenges, from evolving staffing needs within the organization to meeting the changing needs of the larger community they serve. And the pace of change during this crisis has been dizzying.

Diversity and inclusion (D&I) are imperative to driving bottom-line results in healthcare, but those initiatives frequently stagnate at the organizational values stage. A survey from PwC found that 68% of respondents cited D&I as a stated value or priority at their organization, but half of respondents felt that diversity was a barrier to progression. 

Real change requires an integrated action plan. 

The First National Healthcare Diversity Conference: 15 Years in the Making

For 15 years, the National Diversity Council (NDC) has been a resource and an advocate for the value of diversity and inclusion (D&I). NDC’s efforts include its annual diversity and leadership conference, but this year, the healthcare industry will also receive its very own diversity conference focusing on the issues unique to healthcare organizations.

3 Healthcare Recruiting Tips to Consider in 2019

Recruiting top talent in healthcare is no easy feat. With growing staffing shortages and a tight labor market, healthcare recruiters continue to face challenges unique only to the field. For example, according to research by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), only 39 percent of respondents said that they had adequate staffing with the right knowledge and skills at least 75 percent of the time.

Healthcare organizations have long been under distinct industry-specific pressures, and human resources professionals in healthcare need innovative approaches to manage those challenges effectively. As healthcare companies cope with an aging customer base, expanding coverage and an avalanche of new technology opportunities and concerns, HR departments will be forced to play an even larger role helping companies and workers adapt to these evolving conditions.

Every organization has its own success factors. Whether it is from its shared goals and vision or its strategic focus, there is no “one size fits all” solution. Today, employees must feel safe and supported by company leadership, and leaders must establish a culture where employees feel like they can thrive and grow. When workers see no room for development or have no understanding on how they can contribute, they will take the first opportunity from a competitor.

3 Ways Healthcare HR Can Use Diversity to Improve Patient Care

Generational diversity is rapidly changing the workforce dynamics, and this includes the healthcare workplace. Each generation has their own priorities, attitudes, communication styles, work approaches and ways of interacting with colleagues, which can influence organizational culture and performance. Although these differences can bring new challenges to the workplace, they can also play a key role in delivering better care to patients.