6 Best Practices for Implementing a Continuous Monitoring Program

For Cisive's most recent benchmark report, Cisive Insights: Talent Screening Trends 2021, Cisive surveyed more than 1,500 human resources, talent acquisition, compliance, and recruitment professionals worldwide to get a big picture view of the talent screening landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic.

A year of unprecedented challenges resulting from the global pandemic has dramatically shifted how we all attract, hire, screen, and onboard new talent.

Employers across the globe have had to quickly adapt to a new world of hybrid or work-from-home environments, converting to virtual hiring processes in order to complete daily tasks such as interviews and onboarding.

A growing number of states are beginning to implement new identity protection rules that may impact employer background screening. As more court records have personal identifying information (PII) like driver’s license numbers and birth dates removed, background checks will become increasingly difficult.

Here are a few changes that are currently on the horizon:

Michigan Courts to Shield Personal Identifying Information Starting in 2022

HR leaders are very familiar with company audits, risk assessments, and gap analyses for skills, talent, and hiring needs. However, you don’t always take the time to audit your own department, identify potential risks and opportunities to strengthen resources, and ensure compliance best practices.

The areas within HR that create the greatest risk are likely the same areas on which you and your team expend the greatest amount of time and energy, such as: 

According to the SentencingProject.org, nearly one in three adults in the U.S.—or 70 million Americans—have a criminal record, including those who were arrested but not convicted. For many of these individuals, a criminal record creates a significant barrier to employment, even when the record includes only a misdemeanor arrest or conviction.

Background screening is vital for meeting regulatory and accreditation standards in healthcare, but because background checks are triggered at the time of offer, they are largely considered a necessary evil of the pre-employment process. Once an employer decides to hire an individual, they have been through requisition creation, multiple interviews, and even pre-hire assessments, all before an offer is made. This puts tremendous pressure on the background screening partner and the entire onboarding process to ensure that the new hire is making it into the earliest orientation possible.

Changes in background screening legislation are occurring at state and local levels across the U.S. This complex patchwork of regulations creates a complicated landscape for enterprise organizations operating across multiple states and municipalities. Local legislative changes can develop rapidly, so employers must be alert to remain compliant.

There’s been a renewed imperative in human resources to create a culture of safety and belonging at work. Part of delivering on that imperative is conducting background checks on your new hires. A 2020 joint survey between HR.com and the Professional Background Screening Association (formerly the National Association of Professional Background Screeners) revealed that 94% of respondents perform at least one type of employment screening.

On a federal level, legislation intended to ban the question about criminal records on all job applications was introduced in Congress in 2012 and was tabled, but with no vote taken. While the U.S Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) designated exclusion of a criminal record box as a best practice for equitable hiring.

Hospitals and other healthcare organizations are increasingly focused on improving the quality of patient care. This is driven partly by the move to value-based reimbursement models, competition among healthcare companies, and the more recent COVID-19 public health emergency, which put a spotlight on healthcare’s strengths and weaknesses.

With more attention than ever placed on the quality of care, what can healthcare organizations do to improve? Here are a few ideas you should consider.

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