Traditionally, the background check process is performed in tandem with skills assessments and final interviews during the hiring process. However, in 2021, about 19% of organizations conducted post-hire background checks, according to survey data from the Professional Background Screening Association (PBSA). That's up from 12% in 2020.

Millions of Americans have changed or quit their jobs in recent years, leading to a movement now known as the “Great Resignation.” Over 38 million U.S. workers quit their jobs in 2021, and about 20 million quit in the first five months of 2022.

Running an employment background check is an integral part of the hiring process. A quick turnaround time on these checks is vital to a smooth onboarding process for your candidates and your organization.

What can you do to help speed up the time it takes to receive your completed results? And what should you consider if it’s taking longer than you expected?

What affects turnaround time?

When Placing an Order

Missing or incomplete information is the primary cause of a delayed background check when placing the order.

5 Best Practices for Creating a Global Employee Onboarding Strategy

The purpose of employee onboarding should be setting new hires up for success and decreasing the time it takes for them to become comfortable in their new roles and this works best if onboarding processes are designed strategically with the end goal in mind. However, the rise of remote and hybrid work, along with an increase in globally dispersed teams, has complicated the global employee onboarding experience.

With so many employers struggling to hire and keep talented workers, employers might be looking for shortcuts to hire faster. Some employers have lowered job requirements, such as college degrees, and others have walked a risky line by eliminating or postponing background screening and using conditional offers of employment.

As the talent marketplace gets more challenging, employers are expanding into new locations and territories where complexity has increased due to both global expansion and sourcing international talent. With the surge in remote work following a global pandemic, companies are no longer as reliant on work visa programs and immigration laws to fill talent needs.

While employers are evaluating background screening services or making policy decisions about employment background checks, there are multiple references to “seven years.” This can create confusion for employers using background checks in hiring, as not all background checks are created equal. Depending on the context, this common window of time may refer to:

Since the pandemic began, roles have been moved around within healthcare systems to fill urgent needs. Clinicians have been overworked and fatigued, and all of this disruption has affected patient safety outcomes. Preventable central-line associated bloodstream infections, for example, have risen 51% compared to pre-pandemic rates.

2020 was an unprecedented year reminding us how rapidly change can affect the workplace; 2021 proved to be just as challenging for employers. On the employment background screening front, employers must ensure these changes are reflected in their screening policies. Having an updated company policy in place gives clarity to a background check and protects your company from potential liability around the use of background screening information.

6 Best Practices for Implementing a Continuous Monitoring Program

For Cisive's most recent benchmark report, Cisive Insights: Talent Screening Trends 2021, Cisive surveyed more than 1,500 human resources, talent acquisition, compliance, and recruitment professionals worldwide to get a big picture view of the talent screening landscape during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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