“Put yourself in the other person’s shoes” is commonly expressed to someone who lacks understanding or compassion for another person’s situation or point of view. In fact, to have compassion, experts say is to be able to live with the other's misfortune but also to feel with him any emotion such as joy, happiness, anxiety, pain and even fear. Not only is compassion important for effective team building in the workplace, but in healthcare, it’s also critical for developing empathetic employees who care for vulnerable patients every day.

Earlier this month, medical services professionals (MSPs) gathered at the Long Beach Convention Center in California for the 42nd National Association Medical Staff Services (NAMSS) Educational Conference and Exhibition. The 2018 conference theme, “Innovation for Patient Safety,” not only reflects the constant forces driving change in the healthcare industry, but also the medical services profession’s ongoing commitment to patient safety.

How does an employer know if their employees have been arrested or convicted of a crime while on the job? The truth is, unless employers run recurring criminal history checks post-hire, they simply won’t know. 

Although not a novel concept, the practice of continuous, constant background screening has recently gained momentum among employers.

The 2018 American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) Conference took place this past week in the Steel City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This year’s theme was “Meeting the Challenge and Making a Difference,” which highlighted the always changing healthcare environment: from physician reimbursement, hospital quality measure, legislative updates, the increasing workforce shortage and more.

The competition for top healthcare talent remains fierce. Healthcare organizations see an average turnover of about 30 percent in employees’ first year, according to the HealthcareSource Blog. Twenty percent of healthcare staff report feeling ambivalent or disengaged.

Mentoring is key to the development of healthcare professionals and can play an important role in advancing the quality of care in the United States.

Workforce issues remain a key concern for healthcare employers as we navigate through an era of change, transformation and uncertainty. From talent shortages to demographic changes and consolidation to emerging technologies, these are just a few of the factors and implications for the way hospitals, health systems and other related entities need to staff their organizations.

Healthcare organizations have long been under distinct industry-specific pressures, and human resources professionals in healthcare need innovative approaches to manage those challenges effectively. As healthcare companies cope with an aging customer base, expanding coverage and an avalanche of new technology opportunities and concerns, HR departments will be forced to play an even larger role helping companies and workers adapt to these evolving conditions.

The U.S. healthcare system has long struggled to control costs, improve quality and expand access, but a wave of technologies and approaches are poised to usher in a new era of innovation with the potential to transform care in dramatic ways.

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