Healthcare providers play a critical role in today’s society – providing care for hundreds of thousands of Americans each year. As an industry, they have seen firsthand the devastating impact of drug use and abuse today. But with higher than average rates of use and addiction in their own employer population, how are employers in healthcare able to manage their own workforce? 

A lot of organizations boast about having a people-centered culture, but how does that apply in the healthcare sector, where outcomes can literally mean life or death, and workers are under constant strain to deliver top-quality care?

At its core, a people-centered culture is one that puts the human element at the top of its strategic priorities — the patients they serve, of course, but also those internally and externally who get the job done of serving those vulnerable populations. It promotes open dialogue, constant feedback, mentorship and transparency.

Healthcare employees often experience personal satisfaction from their work — helping people is a great motivator. But sustaining happiness over time can be a challenge, and the high-pressure environment can put employees at risk for stress and burnout.

Last week, the 22nd Health Care Compliance Association (HCCA) Compliance Institute was held in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 3,000 healthcare compliance professionals gathered at the single most comprehensive healthcare compliance conference. Besides learning about the latest developments and priorities from regulators, the Compliance Institute offers networking opportunities and educational tracks to help attendees strengthen their organization’s compliance program.

Healthcare organizations are facing a wide variety of challenges as the healthcare landscape evolves. As a result, healthcare HR is approaching a crossroads: With the fast-moving changes in how care is provided and paid for, healthcare HR leaders should consider restructuring the work they do to help their organizations succeed.

Every organization has its own success factors. Whether it is from its shared goals and vision or its strategic focus, there is no “one size fits all” solution. Today, employees must feel safe and supported by company leadership, and leaders must establish a culture where employees feel like they can thrive and grow. When workers see no room for development or have no understanding on how they can contribute, they will take the first opportunity from a competitor.

Selecting a talent screening partner is a challenging decision-making process for any business, but it is an even more significant decision for healthcare organizations. A thorough background screening program not only supports a healthcare compliance program, it can also impact patient safety.

The background screening industry offers healthcare employers no shortage of options for employment screening vendors. As someone who has been part of the decision-making process for my share of company initiatives, I can understand how this can be a daunting process.

Providers make decisions based on evidence every day in a healthcare organization. They’re prescribing treatments and medications, ordering surgeries and sending people home, all according to the evidence they gather in the course of their work. This approach is a valuable one for HR leaders as well, leading to strong outcomes rooted in data — but for many it will mean a change.

The challenges in healthcare HR are clear: an ongoing talent crunch, shifting regulations and reimbursement models, and ongoing mergers and acquisitions. To meet these challenges, HR leaders must focus on their core strengths and roles to implement talent strategies that support the bottom line.

4 Ways Healthcare HR Can Drive Engagement

Employee engagement in healthcare settings can bring enviable returns: A hospital that worked with Gallup to improve engagement decreased turnover costs by $1.7 million in three years and increased its operating margins.

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