Design thinking. It’s a popular buzzword in HR and operations circles these days. But while you might associate “design” with creative fields or Silicon Valley startups, there’s a new movement to use design thinking in healthcare organizations.

On March 27th, the House of Representatives passed HR 7, the “Paycheck Fairness Act,” by a vote of 242 to 187.  This bill includes several provisions intended to promote gender pay equity in the workplace.

Section 10 of the bill would amend the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to restrict the ability of covered employers to consider wage history information during the hiring process.

The bill would make it unlawful for covered employers to:

Healthcare compliance officers are challenged with overseeing their organization's compliance program, but they can’t do it alone, especially when it comes to new hires. They must partner with HR to ensure compliance is effectively integrated into the overall onboarding process.

A job candidate’s journey with a company from application to hire (or not hire) is no longer just a process, it’s an experience. As a job seeker travels through the different recruitment phases—sourcing, interviewing, screening, hiring and onboarding—they naturally develop their own perception or opinion of your company. Whether it’s a positive or negative experience, it can have a lasting impact on your employer brand.

With the combination of an aging workforce and a growing demand for services, the ongoing search for talent will continue to rank among the top human resources concerns for healthcare organizations through 2019 and beyond. 

While the talent shortage alone would be enough to test HR departments for the next several years, ongoing digital transformation and the incorporation of emerging artificial intelligence and automated tools — particularly in the recruiting space — are forcing further adaptation.

Healthcare is rapidly changing. Amid the industry’s ongoing turbulence, physician and staff engagement are suffering. Burnout and turnover rates can be especially high, and can have particularly high costs, with dissatisfaction contributing to poor performance and preventable medical errors.

Healthcare organizations have one mission—to provide quality care to patients. And nurses are integral to accomplishing that mission.

One employment screening topic that has gained momentum over the past year is the practice of continuous background screening. More than ever, employers are starting to weigh the advantages of conducting post-hire screenings on their workforce.

The benefits for employers are clear: a continuous background screening program allows employers to make highly informed employment retention decisions. For healthcare employers, however, adopting this type of talent screening program also demonstrates their commitment to workplace and patient safety.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is disrupting many industries, and healthcare is no exception. But when it comes to data, AI and analytics, what’s on the horizon for the healthcare industry? How can healthcare organizations get better at using technology to empower their organizations for success? What are the latest advancements?

Healthcare is the fastest-growing sector of the U.S. economy, employing over 18 million workers. Healthcare workers face a wide range of hazards on the job, including sharps injuries, harmful exposures to chemicals and hazardous drugs, back injuries, violence, and stress. Drug use and abuse in the workplace not only puts the employees and patients at risk, it leaves the employers vulnerable to negligence claims and costs.  A strong and defensible drug and alcohol testing program and policy, including a robust random testing program, helps protect employers and their bottom line. 

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