The competition for top healthcare talent remains fierce. Healthcare organizations see an average turnover of about 30 percent in employees’ first year, according to the HealthcareSource Blog. Twenty percent of healthcare staff report feeling ambivalent or disengaged.

Mentoring is key to the development of healthcare professionals and can play an important role in advancing the quality of care in the United States.

Workforce issues remain a key concern for healthcare employers as we navigate through an era of change, transformation and uncertainty. From talent shortages to demographic changes and consolidation to emerging technologies, these are just a few of the factors and implications for the way hospitals, health systems and other related entities need to staff their organizations.

Healthcare organizations have long been under distinct industry-specific pressures, and human resources professionals in healthcare need innovative approaches to manage those challenges effectively. As healthcare companies cope with an aging customer base, expanding coverage and an avalanche of new technology opportunities and concerns, HR departments will be forced to play an even larger role helping companies and workers adapt to these evolving conditions.

Workplace appreciation is inarguably one of the most important drivers of a positive and engaging work environment. All of us thrive in an atmosphere where appreciation is well regarded. In fact, experts say the lack of recognition is the key reason why employees quit their jobs. Not only does the lack of appreciation affect job satisfaction and staff retention, but it also impacts the organization’s bottom line.

The intense competition to hire for healthcare organizations shows no signs of abating, as demand for care increases while more baby boomers are retiring every day. As a result, too often healthcare companies find themselves hiring haphazardly, taking into account a candidate’s qualifications but not how they will fit with the company’s culture.

A new mindset is to have a “holistic” recruiting strategy. It’s an idea that has been talked about in broader human resources circles, but is just making its way to the healthcare sector. Here’s what you need to know.

Attracting quality talent, increasing retention, and reducing cost-per-hire are just some of the reasons why developing a successful employer brand is crucial to an organization’s long-term success. In fact, recent reports reveal that companies who prioritize employer branding typically see a 50 percent increase in qualified candidates; a 28 percent decrease in turnover; and a 43 percent decrease in cost-per-hire. 

One of the top workplace challenges facing the healthcare industry today is hiring for the right cultural fit. Even as providers fight over a finite pool of qualified healthcare talent, leaders have come to recognize that it’s essential to attract and retain people who can reflect and champion the values and mission of the organization.

Here are some important things human resources leaders need to know to align their talent-acquisition strategy with their company culture.

Several years ago, my colleague Vu T. Do, PreCheck’s Vice President of Compliance, discussed a growing concern for employers as our investigators noticed an uptake in the detection and reporting of diploma mills. Unfortunately, this is not the only trend with which healthcare employers should be concerned.

Vermont’s recreational marijuana law, Act 86, goes into effect on July 1, 2018. While employers still broadly retain their same rights to test for marijuana, prohibit it’s use in the workplace, and discipline based on a marijuana-positive drug test, Act 86 brings about nuances to workplace drug testing in the state that employers should be aware of.

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