Last month, I joined over a thousand of my fellow marketers in San Francisco, California for the 2018 B2B Marketing Forum. While not a healthcare conference, I think this year’s theme, “Learning Changes Lives,” can apply to any industry, but especially in healthcare where practitioners and staff not only change but also save lives for the patients they treat.

The end of the year is often an opportune time for departments, including human resources, to reflect and take a hard look at daily operations. From retention to talent development and recognition to performance feedback, it’s important for HR to decide what processes are working, those that aren’t working, and how to address any red flags moving forward. 

To keep things simple, here are some of the latest HR issues to consider as you focus on improvements for a more efficient and successful new year.

The long-term success of any organization depends on its ability to adapt and survive through times of great change. Healthcare organizations, in particular, have faced several changes to their daily operational processes within the last couple of years—such as the new payment model and meaningful use requirements—and will continue to face challenges due to aggressive growth, advancing technologies, a multi-generational workforce, and the list goes on. 

For healthcare organizations facing a hyper-competitive market and an aging customer base that requires more care, contingent staffing, also known as supplemental staffing, can play an integral role in HR's strategic planning process as a means to acquire on-demand, qualified healthcare talent.

Cultivating the right culture can make a meaningful impact in patient care for healthcare organizations. As the industry faces ongoing changes such as population health and value-based care, a strong organizational culture can enable organizations to succeed in tomorrow’s environment. But how can healthcare HR professionals enable their organizations to drive change?

Here are a few ways HR can serve as a catalyst for cultural change in healthcare organizations.

“Put yourself in the other person’s shoes” is commonly expressed to someone who lacks understanding or compassion for another person’s situation or point of view. In fact, to have compassion, experts say is to be able to live with the other's misfortune but also to feel with him any emotion such as joy, happiness, anxiety, pain and even fear. Not only is compassion important for effective team building in the workplace, but in healthcare, it’s also critical for developing empathetic employees who care for vulnerable patients every day.

How does an employer know if their employees have been arrested or convicted of a crime while on the job? The truth is, unless employers run recurring criminal history checks post-hire, they simply won’t know. 

Although not a novel concept, the practice of continuous, constant background screening has recently gained momentum among employers.

The 2018 American Society for Healthcare Human Resources Administration (ASHHRA) Conference took place this past week in the Steel City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This year’s theme was “Meeting the Challenge and Making a Difference,” which highlighted the always changing healthcare environment: from physician reimbursement, hospital quality measure, legislative updates, the increasing workforce shortage and more.

The competition for top healthcare talent remains fierce. Healthcare organizations see an average turnover of about 30 percent in employees’ first year, according to the HealthcareSource Blog. Twenty percent of healthcare staff report feeling ambivalent or disengaged.

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