As we kick off the New Year, here’s a look back at the most popular posts from the previous year. 2018 was a year with a heightened focus on compliance for employers as FCRA litigation ensues while the healthcare industry faces the ongoing challenges of a rapidly changing sector. Background check compliance, drug testing, workplace appreciation, and the Death Master File Search are all topics that were most popular among our readers in the past year.

In this tight job market, companies are being forced to approach the candidate experience in a new way.

Katrina Kibben, CEO and founder of Three Ears Media, which seeks to help brands improve the candidate experience, explains it this way: “Right now the candidate experience is like a one-way mirror, where all these candidates are walking by the glass. You're seeing them, but they aren't seeing you.”

3 Ways Healthcare HR Can Become Agile

Constant change is the new reality in healthcare.

In this complex ecosystem where transformation is a given, HR departments that are able to leverage innovation are going to help their organizations succeed. According to Harvard Business Review, agile teams that include small entrepreneurial groups that can adapt quickly to changing conditions are best suited to innovation.

The end of the year is often an opportune time for departments, including human resources, to reflect and take a hard look at daily operations. From retention to talent development and recognition to performance feedback, it’s important for HR to decide what processes are working, those that aren’t working, and how to address any red flags moving forward. 

To keep things simple, here are some of the latest HR issues to consider as you focus on improvements for a more efficient and successful new year.

The long-term success of any organization depends on its ability to adapt and survive through times of great change. Healthcare organizations, in particular, have faced several changes to their daily operational processes within the last couple of years—such as the new payment model and meaningful use requirements—and will continue to face challenges due to aggressive growth, advancing technologies, a multi-generational workforce, and the list goes on. 

For healthcare organizations facing a hyper-competitive market and an aging customer base that requires more care, contingent staffing, also known as supplemental staffing, can play an integral role in HR's strategic planning process as a means to acquire on-demand, qualified healthcare talent.

Cultivating the right culture can make a meaningful impact in patient care for healthcare organizations. As the industry faces ongoing changes such as population health and value-based care, a strong organizational culture can enable organizations to succeed in tomorrow’s environment. But how can healthcare HR professionals enable their organizations to drive change?

Here are a few ways HR can serve as a catalyst for cultural change in healthcare organizations.

“Put yourself in the other person’s shoes” is commonly expressed to someone who lacks understanding or compassion for another person’s situation or point of view. In fact, to have compassion, experts say is to be able to live with the other's misfortune but also to feel with him any emotion such as joy, happiness, anxiety, pain and even fear. Not only is compassion important for effective team building in the workplace, but in healthcare, it’s also critical for developing empathetic employees who care for vulnerable patients every day.

How does an employer know if their employees have been arrested or convicted of a crime while on the job? The truth is, unless employers run recurring criminal history checks post-hire, they simply won’t know. 

Although not a novel concept, the practice of continuous, constant background screening has recently gained momentum among employers.

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